• Tractorcade photo by Jeff Tinsley, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Negative Number: 79-1700-29.
    Tractorcade 1979
     
     
    In February 1979, thousands of farmers came to Washington on tractors to demonstrate for agriculture policy reform. They snarled traffic for weeks but then came to the rescue when an unexpected blizzard buried the city under two feet of snow.
  • Jeannette Rankin
    It Happened Here
     
     
    In 1916, Jeannette Rankin became the first woman elected to Congress. 52 years later, she marched against the Vietnam War.
  • Mary Church Terrell
    Civil Rights History
     
     
    Mary Church Terrell's 1906 speech on race in Washington, D.C. was a scathing indictment of the city, which inspired generations of activists.
  • Wright Military Flyer flying at Ft Myer in 1909. Photo courtesy of the College Park Aviation Museum.
    Flight Milestones
     
     
    In 1908-1909, Orville and Wilbur Wright taught the first military pilots to fly at Fort Myer in Arlington and convinced a curious public that their flying machine was real in College Park, Maryland.
  • Two African American children in Washington, D.C. alley. (Photo source: Library of Congress)
    Standing Room Only
     
     
    In the movies and in real life, Washington, D.C. had a serious housing shortage during World War II.
Tractors in front of the Capitol

Tractorcade 1979

In February 1979, thousands of farmers from across the country — and their tractors — barreled into Washington to protest in favor of agriculture policy reform. They snarled traffic for several weeks, frustrating commuters. But public opinion began to shift when an unexpected blizzard buried the city under two feet of snow and the protesters took it upon themselves to plow city streets and ferry doctors and nurses to work.

Jeannette Rankin

The Jeannette Rankin Brigade

In 1916, Jeannette Rankin made history as the first woman elected to Congress. A renowned pacifist, Rankin was the only member of Congress to vote against U.S. involvement in World War II. At age 87, Rankin made one final push for peace by leading an anti-Vietnam march: the Jeannette Rankin Brigade.

Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield

Clara Barton during the Civil War. Photo by Matthew Brady. (Source: Library of Congress)

She was one of the first female government employees, she was the first woman legally allowed on the battlefield in America, she founded the American Red Cross, and she chose to live out her days in Glen Echo, Maryland. Clara Barton, the unstoppable force of the 19th century.

The Beatles hold a press conference in the Washington Senators' locker room at D.C. Stadium, August 15 1966. (Source: Bettmann/Getty Images)

The Beatles' Final D.C. Concert

Although their first appearance in Washington D.C. was certainly more historic, the Beatles' last visit was nothing if not eventful, and verged on the downright bizarre. In stark contrast to that triumphant first U.S. concert at Washington Coliseum in February 1964, by August 1966 the Beatles were mired in controversy, struggling to sell out concerts, and creating music too complex to be replicated on stage.

The Summer Movie Blockbuster Comes to D.C.

Uptown Theater, Washington, D.C. (Credit:  Highsmith, Carol M., photographer. Photographs in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

Summer blockbusters are typically films driven by special effects and large set pieces with plots that involve major threats to America or the Earth in general. What better location to feature all these elements than Washington, D.C.? As the nation’s capital and one of the world’s most recognizable cities, Washington is tailor made to be a focal point in summer movie blockbusters.

Photograph of Mary Church Terrell as a young adult.

Impressions of Washington: Mary Church Terrell’s Activism

Educator, author, and activist Mary Church Terrell was the first president of the National Association for Colored Women, the first African-American woman elected to a major city school board, and a founding member of the NAACP. A lifelong advocate for equality, Terrell participated in sit-ins well into her eighties. But out of all of her activism, one 1906 speech stands out as an insightful and damning critique of racial dynamics in the nation's capital.

Richard Nixon shaking hands with Reverend Sun Myung Moon

A Watergate Christmas Tree Lighting

The  first National Christmas Tree lighting ceremony took place in 1923. The ceremony was intended to foster a sense of national unity around the Holiday season, but 1973 was different. President Nixon, embroiled in the Watergate scandal and dealing with an energy crisis, used the ceremony as a platform for political theater. As the President talked up his adminstration's achievements and legislative agenda for the coming year, an impromtu political rally in support of the President broke out.

Not only were the President's remarks different in nature, the tree was as well. As Americans across the country had to tighten their belts with regards to energy, the energy crisis prompted organizers to significantly reduce the amount of lights upon the tree itself as well as begin a new tradition of using a living, rather than cut, National Christmas Tree.

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