• Washington Senators' player Joe Judge during 1924 World Series. (Source: Library of Congress)
    Washington Senators
    Up until recently, photos and newspaper accounts were the only sources baseball fans could use to picture the Washington Senators' 1924 World Championship.
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald grave in Rockville, Maryland. (Source: Wikipedia)
    Local Attraction
    Most of us read The Great Gatsby at some point in school, but did you know that author F. Scott Fitzgerald has a local connection?
  • George Washington portrait by Gilbert Stuart
    Strange But True
    Who knew that the father of our country was also a deadbeat library patron?
  • Langley Aerodrome (Source: Wikipedia)
    Strange But True
    Who was Samuel Langley and why did the Smithsonian long credit him -- not the Wright Bros -- with being the first to fly?
  • Pope John Paul II holds his crozier to his face during mass he celebrated on the mall in Washington, D.C., Oct. 7, 1979. At the pontiff's side is Monsignor Virgilio Noe of the Vatican. (AP Photo/Paul Vathis)
    Pope John Paul II
    For longtime Washingtonians, the excitement over Pope Francis's recent visit to Washington is like turning back the clock to 1979.

The Golden Age of D.C. Sportscasters

It was Super Bowl XVII in Pasadena, California. The Washington Redskins were set to take on the Miami Dolphins in a rematch from their meeting in Super Bowl VII a decade before. Outside of a Pasadena hotel designated for the media, a group of sixteen men jovially sang and hugged each other. At their center, a recognizable voice could be heard over the merriment.  “Ladies and gentlemen this is the class of ’83. These sixteen men ran up the highest hotel bill in the history of Western civilization.”

The voice belonged to Glenn Brenner, Washington’s comedic evening sports broadcaster from Channel 9 news, celebrating with his crew. The men did indeed tally up a massive hotel bill, yet there was one detail that Brenner left out of his speech. He had charged the bill to George Michael’s room, his rival sportscaster at Channel 4.

The Tizard Mission: The Briefcase That Changed World War II

Sir Henry Thomas Tizard (Source: National Portrait Gallery, London)

On the morning of August 29, 1940, while the Battle of Britain raged in the skies overhead, a small group of men boarded an ocean liner and left the country with the nation’s most sensitive military secrets.

These men were not spies or Nazi sympathizers. They were among the United Kingdom’s foremost civilian and military scientists, and they were headed for Washington, D.C. in an attempt to turn the tide of the war, which at that point was going very heavily in favor of Nazi Germany.

Pope John Paul II celebrates Mass on National Mall, 1979. (AP/Paul Vathis)

D.C.'s First Papal Visit, 1979

Streets are being shut down... Huge crowds are expected to overwhelm the city's Metro system... There are security concerns... For longtime Washingtonians, the excitement over Pope Francis's inaugural visit is like turning back the clock.

Pope John Paul II during his 1993 visit to the United States. (Source: Wikipedia)

The Pope's Condo in Alexandria

Every house has a history but few can say that they were blessed by the Pope – especially here in America. There is, however, one Alexandria, Virginia condominium unit that can make the claim. In 1976, while still a cardinal, the future Pope John Paul II visited the Parkfairfax apartment of Polish-American journalist John Szostak and offered his blessing... after a near accident with a Batmobile toy belonging to one of Szostak's children.

Cover of December 8, 1957 Sunday Star magazine, which featured Sam and Friends.

The Muppets Take Maryland

Jim Henson’s shows and characters are renowned throughout the world. Creator of The Muppet Show, Labyrinth, and, of course, the beloved Sesame Street, Henson gained fame through his innovative puppetry, his unique characters, and his ability to tackle serious and educational subjects while still retaining the humor and sense of fun that characterized all of his work. By the late ‘60s, all of America was familiar with Henson and his creations. But the people of the D.C. area were the first to see his Muppets in action, and it was in D.C. that he got his first big break.

Margaret Gorman was as surprised as anyone when she was named Miss America. (Source: Wikipedia)

D.C.'s Margaret Gorman Becomes the First Miss America

Most 16-year-old girls dream of being popular. And while some can claim to be the queen bees of their high schools, not many can maintain that they are the most popular girl in the country. In 1921, though, Margaret Gorman could. Fresh out of her junior year at Western High School (later the Duke Ellington School of the Arts) in Georgetown, Margaret went from being a regular teenager to the best-known girl in the nation when Atlantic City judges crowned her the first Miss America.

Cipriano Ferrandini addresses other members of the Baltimore plot. Image orginally printed in From The Spy of the Rebellion, by Allan Pinkerton, 1883. (Source: Maryland State Archives)

The Thwarted Plot to Kill Lincoln on the Streets of Baltimore

Abraham Lincoln’s election to the presidency on November 6, 1860, was the catalyst for vehement anger in the South, where the wave of secession had already begun to stir. The anger at the president-elect became so great that several conspirators vowed he would never reach the capitol to be inaugurated.

By many accounts, Lincoln was aware but unmoved by the threats that rose around him in early 1861 as he prepared to relocate from his home in Springfield, Illinois to the White House. He planned a grand 2000-mile whistle stop tour that would take his train through seventy cities and towns on the way to his inauguration. He was sure to be greeted by thousands of well-wishers, but a more sinister element was also gathering.

Walt Whitman in Washington, D.C.

The kids are back in school but they aren't the only ones who can get an education. On Thursday, September 10 at 7pm, the Arlington Historical Society opens its 2015-2016 program season with a talk by Garrett Peck, author of Walt Whitman in Washington, D.C.: The Civil War and America's Great Poet. The talk will take place in Marymount University's Reinsch Library auditorium and is free and open to the public.

In advance of his talk, Garrett was kind enough to sit down with Boundary Stones and give us a preview. Check out the video above and learn more after the jump.

Kate Chase c. 1861 (Photo source: Wikipedia)

Kate Chase: Washington's 19th Century Supreme

In the second half of the 19th century, Kate Chase (1840-1899) was known the country over as the most beautiful and influential woman there ever was in Washington. She occupied the most powerful position in Washington society that a woman could hold, and held sway far beyond her gender. A National Tribune article from 1898, a year before her death, called her life the history of the Civil war itself, stating:

"No one woman had more to do with influencing the movements on the military and the political chessboard than she, and it was her influence largely that kept McClellan at the head of the military.”