• Andrew Jackson
    Politics
     
     
    The vicious election of 1828 ended with a fractured nation, a partisan media, a populist in the White House, and a rowdy party at the White House.
  • William Henry Harrison (Source: Library of Congress)
    Presidential History
     
     
    Sometimes words can kill ... especially when you speak for hours on a cold day without wearing a coat. Just ask President William Henry Harrison.
  • The great inauguration ball for Ulysses S. Grant, March 4, 1873, in the temporary building in Judiciary Square, from a sketch by Jas. E. Taylor. (Photo: Library of Congress)
    Presidential History
     
     
    March 4th, 1873 — Ulysses S. Grant's second inauguration — still stands as the coldest March day on record for Washington, and by all accounts it was an unmitigated wintry disaster.
  • Jeannette Rankin
    It Happened Here
     
     
    In 1916, Jeannette Rankin became the first woman elected to Congress. 52 years later, she marched against the Vietnam War.
  • German actress Hedwig Reicher wearing costume of "Columbia" with other suffrage pageant participants standing in background in front of the Treasury Building, March 3, 1913, Washington, D.C. (Source: Library of Congress)
    Women's Suffrage
     
     
    On March 3, 1913 five thousand women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. They were immediately besieged by angry crowds of men calling insults.
Police removing sit-in participants from the Alexandria Library (Source: Wiikpedia)

Alexandria Library Sit-In, 1939

In 1939 -- decades before Virginia schools were integrated, and sit-ins emerged as a primary strategy for protesting segregated businesses and public facilities in the South -- Alexandria, Virginia lawyer Samuel Tucker organized a successful sit-in to demonstrate against the Alexandria Library's "whites only" policy. It is believed to be the first sit-in for desegregation in American history.

Tyson vs. McBride Poster

Iron Mike Calls it Quits in Washington

Mike Tyson, the so-called "Baddest Man on the Planet," was known for his antics, in and out of the ring, as much as he was known for his boxing ability. While Tyson's sole fight in the nation's capital isn't his most well-known fight, the bout was certainly historic.

The Howard University Fight Over Vaccination

Image of a gravestone of someone who allegedly died of vaccine poisoning at school (Source: Thomas Boudren, An Open Letter to the Governor and Members of the General Assembly of Connecticut, Bridgeport, Connecticut: Press of the Farmer Pub., Co., 1911)

Prior to 1909, Harry Bradford had almost never landed himself on the paper. He appeared in the Washington Post once, when it announced that the Kensington Orchestra was going to be performing in the near future. (Bradford played violin.) But other than that, nothing. And yet, in 1910, Bradford’s name was in all caps on the front page of the Post. “Bradford told to quit,” the headline read.

Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington’s Education at Frank Holliday's Pool Hall

In 1910, the Howard Theater was founded in the Washington's Shaw neighborhood, and it soon became the premier black theater in the country, helping launch the careers of many African American performers. But for Duke Ellington, who was a fixture in the neighborhood as a kid, the pool hall next door to the theatre did more to shape is musical sensibilities.

Photograph of the Soviet Embassy (Source: Library of Congress, Historic American Buildings Survey)

A Thwarted Protest at the Soviet Embassy

On August 24, 1973, about 20 D.C. Jewish school children gathered around the Soviet Embassy holding onto basketballs. It was around noon, and they were getting ready to bounce the balls just loud enough for Soviet officials to hear. But they weren't there to play; they were there to stage a political protest.

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