• Dr. S. M. Johnson stands next to the Zero Milestone marker. (Photo source: Library of Congress)
    The Zero Milestone
     
     
    In the 1920s, proponents of the Good Roads Movement tried to make D.C. the center of the Western Hemisphere, at least as far as highways were concerned.
  • Activists at drug store counter in Arlington. (Source: Washington Area Spark on Flickr.)
    Civil Rights Movement
     
     
    In June 1960, students from the Non-Violent Action Group staged successful sit-ins at several Arlington lunch counters.
  • Muhammad Ali - 1967 World Journal Tribune photo by Ira Rosenberg. (Source: Library of Congress)
    Muhammad Ali
     
     
    In April 1967, days before Muhammad Ali refused military induction, he came to Howard University and gave one of his most famous speeches.
  • Unveiling of Confederate Memorial at Arlington, 1914
    It Happened Here
     
     
    On June 4, 1914, a crowd gathered at Arlington National Cemetery to dedicate a unique monument of healing.
  • National Hotel c. 1909 (Source: Library of Congress)
    It Happened Here
     
     
    What’s better for a president-elect waiting to move into the White House than to stay in one of the swankiest hotels in the nation's capital? In 1857, a lot.
Would you give this man a library card? (Source: Wikipedia)

George Washington’s Overdue Books

George Washington, the father of our country, was a deadbeat book borrower? Apparently so. In April of 2010, the New York Library Society was going through the process of restoring and digitizing their holdings when an employee stumbled across the long lost fourteen-volume collection, Common Debates, a collection of transcripts from the English House of Commons. But, the collection was missing a volume. A check of the old circulation ledger proved that volume #12 had last been checked out by library patron George Washington October 5, 1789, along with a book by Emer de Vattel, entitled Law of Nations.

The books were due back on November 2, but according to the records, neither was ever returned.

Hugh Bennett and the Perfect Storm

Think the impacts of the Dust Bowl were only felt in the Great Plains? Think again. In the spring of 1935, a dust storm nearly blocked out the sun above Washington, alarming local citizens and spurring Congress to take action on soil erosion policy.

The Who and Led Zeppelin Concert Poster, Merriweather Post Pavilion, May 25, 1969, Tina Silverman, artist

Merriweather Post's Legendary Double Bill

The Who vs. Led Zeppelin 

It's one of the eternal questions argued by classic rock aficionados — which of these virtuoso power trios could rock the hardest? Perhaps the only people qualified to make that call were those lucky enough to be at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Md. on the night of Sunday, May 25, 1969, when Led Zeppelin opened for The Who in one of the most epic double bills in rock history. It was a pairing of hall of fame live acts that would never be seen again on the same stage.

Capital for a Day

Almost 200 years later, Brookville, Maryland celebrates its brief moment in history. (Photo source: Flickr user dan reed!)

If you’re passing through Brookeville, Maryland these days the town might not seem too different from the other suburban stops along Georgia Avenue. But don’t be fooled. Brookeville has a unique claim to fame. For one day during the War of 1812, it was the capital of the United States.

But if a couple of residents would've had their way, it wouldn't have happened!

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War. (Photo by James A. DeYoung/Alexandria City website)

The Less-Known Unknown

Yesterday, we posted a story about the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown in Arlington National Cemetery in 1921. Most readers are probably familiar with that memorial (and, if they read our post, they now know a little about its history). It is, after all, one of the most sacred places in the country.

But, what you may not know is that there is another Tomb of the Unknown just down the road in Alexandria, Virginia. In the burial yard of the Old Presbyterian Meeting House at 323 South Fairfax Street lies the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the American Revolution. It is just seven miles away from its more famous counterpart, but light-years apart in the amount of attention it receives.

General Ambrose E. Burnside, the father of the sideburn. (Source: Wikipedia)

November is an Appropriate Time to Remember Ambrose E. Burnside

Just as this week’s cold snap sent many people searching for their winter coats, it also reminded some shivering citizens of a particular month-long “celebration” that keeps their cheeks warm, too: “No-Shave November.”

As a person who appreciates history and a good facial hair crop, I couldn’t help but think of certain furry Civil War general who rose to prominence 150 years ago this week.

Buttons like this could be seen around D.C. in 1964 as District residents voted in their first Presidential election. (Source: ebay)

D.C.'s Electoral Vote

It’s Election Day, and hopefully most of you are braving the cold and the lines at your local polling place to make sure your voice is heard. If you cast your ballot for a presidential candidate in the District, you exercised a right that has only been around for 52 years; that’s how long DC residents have had the right to vote in presidential elections, a right granted by the 23rd Amendment.

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