music

Filed Under:DC

Jimi Hendrix in DC

Jimi Hendrix performs at the 1968 Miami Pop Festival. (Photo Courtesy of © Ken Davidoff/Authentic Hendrix LLC)Tomorrow night at 9pm, American Masters is premiering the new documentary "Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin," which includes never-before-aired film footage of a live Hendrix performance at the 1968 Miami Pop Festival, as well as a poignant clip of his final performance in Germany in September 1970, just 12 days before his death at age 27. Check it out on WETA TV26 and WETA HD. (Preview!)

Unlike the Miami show, rock music archivists have yet to discover any film record of the legendary guitarist's three performances in the Washington, DC area in 1967 and 1968 but those shows have become the stuff of local legend.

Filed Under:Maryland, Virginia

Jim Morrison’s Not So Happy Homecoming

Poster advertising August 18, 1967 concert by The Doors in Annapolis and Alexandria. (Photo source: Ebay)It was the summer of 1967 and The Doors’ single “Light My Fire” was racing up the Billboard music charts. The band found itself headlining large venues and even made an appearance on American Bandstand. But one date on the tour schedule might have stood out to front man Jim Morrison more than any other. (Not that he would’ve told anyone.)

On August 18, 1967, the band played an odd D.C. area double-header: a 7:30pm show at the National Guard Armory in Annapolis, Maryland, and a late night show at the Alexandria Roller Rink Arena in Alexandria, Virginia. It was the only time The Doors played two separate concerts at different venues in the same evening. And, for Morrison, it was a homecoming of sorts.

Filed Under:DC

It's Raining Bottles at Griffith Stadium: The Music Battle of 1942

Griffith Stadium hosted hundreds of historic baseball and football games over the years. It was also the venue of a “Battle of Music” between jazz artists Louis Armstrong and Charlie Barnet in the summer of 1942. (Photo source: Wikipedia)On July 23, 1942 Washingtonians packed Griffith Stadium to the gills for a special “Battle of Music” between African American jazz legend Louis Armstrong and white saxophonist Charlie Barnet. In segregated Washington of the 1940s, such an organized interracial competition was a big event and few people – especially in the black community that surrounded the stadium – wanted to miss the “musical fisticuffs.”[1]

Filed Under:DC

The Music Behind the Corcoran's Pump Me Up Exhibit

Trouble Funk poster from Corcoran's Pump Me Up exhibit. (Photo source: Corcoran website)Chuck Brown, Trouble Funk, Rare Essence, Minor Threat, SOA.

If you lived in DC in the 1980s, you probably recognize these as local Go-Go and hardcore bands. If that's the case, the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s newest exhibit, Pump Me Up, is sure to invoke nostalgia. For those who have come here more recently, the exhibit offers a rare opportunity to see how much DC has changed in the last thirty years. (You definitely get a different image of the 80s than at a Legwarmers concert at the State Theatre!) Either way, it's worth a visit.

To put it mildly, the 1980s was a tumultuous period for the District of Columbia. There was a lot going on and homegrown music was right at the center of the city's experience.

Filed Under:DC

Bob Dylan's Greatest Pic

The photo for the Grammy award-winning album cover of Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits was taken at the Washington Coliseum on November 28, 1965. (Source: Wikipedia)Washington doesn't usually get mentioned in the pantheon of great American music cities but we've had our moments. One of them was Sunday, November 28, 1965 — 47 years ago today — when Bob Dylan played the Washington Coliseum.

Curiously, details about the concert itself are scarce — the Washington Post didn't bother to write a review (kind of surprising since Dylan was very well known by 1965), and Dylan's own website doesn't have a setlist from the show. But the singer's visit to Washington was significant for one now-famous image the concert produced.

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