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A New Perspective | New Nature & New NOVA Episodes

Your impression of Earth has a lot to do with your vantage point. This week WETA invites you to view our planet from two extreme locations. We begin in Wood Buffalo National Park with the premiere of Nature: Cold Warriors: Wolves and Buffalo at 8:00pm and then travel to outer space with the premiere of the two-hour special NOVA: Earth from Space at 9:00pm. Join WETA TV26 & WETA HD this Wednesday as we experience nature at ground level and from far above.

Click here to watch video previews of these new shows!

 

Nature: Cold Warriors: Wolves and Buffalo

Before humans’ westward expansion, wolves and buffalo roamed all over the North American plains. Now, as civilization has spread across the continent, these animals have been pushed from their former habitat and have taken refuge in the Wood Buffalo National Park in Northern Canada. In this week’s new Nature episode, filmmaker Jeff Turner follows the interactions of buffalo and one pack of wolves in their fight for survival. Click here to view PBS Nature's "Wolf versus Buffalo" infographic to match up the competitors!

Watch Nature: Cold Warriors: Wolves and Buffalo on WETA TV26 & WETA HD Wednesday, February 13 at 8:00pm. Also airs Thursday at 2:00pm & Monday at 2:30pm

 

NOVA: Earth from Space

NOVA is taking the phrase “take a step back” to entirely new heights. On Wednesday, take a few steps up into outer space to gain a complete understanding of the planet Earth. In this brand new, special two-hour episode, NOVA uses real-time data from satellites to create animated visuals showing how one force of nature affects the rest of the planet. See how you fit into the big picture of this complex world at 9:00pm!  

Watch NOVA: Earth from Space on WETA TV26 & WETA HD Wednesday, February 13 at 9:00pm. Also airs Thursday at 3:00pm

 

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This Week on WETA UK | WETA UK Schedule February 11 - 17

WETA UK will keep you on the edge of your seat this week with new seasons of crime dramas and the premiere of two new series!

Click here to read the full article and watch video previews of these shows.

 

Monday start the week with three back to back crime dramas, beginning with Reilly: Ace of Spies at 8:00pm, a mini-series which follows Sidney Reilly, one of the world’s greatest spies. At 9:00pm, Vera II continues with the death of a military Sergeant in Afghanistan and at 10:30pm the mind-bending investigation of Alex Drake takes a new twist in Ashes to Ashes.

Tuesday MI-5 season 5 begins with a bang at 10:00pm. Chaos ensues after members of Parliament are murdered and what looks like an act of terrorism by Al-Qaeda is soon discovered to be a conspiracy linked much closer to home.

Wednesday the con artists are back at it on Hustle at 10:30pm. Join us as we begin season 7 with new scams and frauds carried out by a talented group of crooks in London.

Thursday at 10:00pm Waking the Dead kicks off season 5 with a not-so-fresh murder when a mummified body is found on an airplane. Can Peter Boyd connect the dots between a convict and businessman to get to the bottom of this case?

Friday is the WETA UK series premiere of Men Behaving Badly at 10:30pm. Starring Martin Clunes (Doc Martin) and Dermot Povey, this comedy explores the lives of two young bachelors sharing an apartment. Their immature ways and binge drinking lead them down paths of trouble, particularly with their respected love interests.

Saturday is the conclusion of The WETA UK Event: The Complete Little Dorrit, the Masterpiece Theatre series based on the classic story by Charles Dickens involving crime, mystery and romance. Part 4 airs 8:00pm-9:30pm and part 5 airs from 9:30pm-11:00pm.

Sunday the series People Like Us­ gets its WETA UK premiere at 9:30pm. This mockumentary of Middle England finds its humor in the inept filmmaker Roy Mallard and literal interpretations of dialogue between interviewer and subject. In this first episode, Peter Wilson, the managing director for Zenotech, discusses staying ahead of the competition.

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Free Movies in DC | WETA Movie Night February 9

With cold & rainy weather coming to the DMV, huddle up to the glow of the television and imagine we’ll be in the hands of warm weather soon. Join WETA for a trip to the tropical beaches of Hawaii Saturday at 9:30pm. If that’s not enough, at 1:30am Sunday we’re heading to hot, humid New Orleans, not for Mardi Gras, but for an emotional journey. Tune into WETA TV26 and WETA HD this Saturday for WETA Movie Night! 

Click here to watch the trailers of these powerful films.

 

Hawaii (1966)

When people hear of Hawaii, most think white sandy beaches, cold cocktails, hula dancers, and sunshine.  Director George Roy Hill takes us down a different path in an attempt to reveal another side of the tropical island in his 1966 motion picture, Hawaii.  The film follows a Christian missionary named Max Von Sydow in his attempt to colonize the native people of Hawaii. Max legally isn’t able to proceed with his trip since he isn’t married so he marries a woman named Jerusha Bromley. Love struck and bedazzled by the idea of going to Hawaii with her new husband, the beautiful and kind-hearted Jerusha is blind to the real motive for this trip. Von Sydow’s determination to convert the islanders to his way of life brings on a cultural collision resulting in violence, sickness and tragedy. 

Watch Hawaii (1966) this Saturday at 9:30pm and again on Sunday at 11:30am.

 

Independent Lens: Mine/Home

Dog is a man’s best friend and as many people know, losing your best friend can be one of the hardest things to face in life.  After Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005, residents were forced to leave everything behind. Thousands of dogs, cats, and other animals were forced to survive on what their owners had left for them. For some of these pet owner’s, leaving them meant losing everything they had.  Soon after the storm, an animal rescue team recovered and sheltered many neglected pets. Follow this journey and the struggle to reunite pets with owners in the Independent Lens documentary Mine/Home.

Tune in this Sunday at 1:30am for Independent Lens: Mine/Home.

WETA TV26 logoCategory:TV26

DC, MD, VA Events: WETA Around Town February 8 - 10

Looking for something to do this weekend in DC, Maryland, and Virginia? Check out our selection of Afghani-American music, Valentine crafting with an Asian twist, and Civil War storytelling right in your own backyard.

 
 
 
With so much competition surrounding originality, many of us hope to find that one talent in life that makes us different from others.  For Afghan/Italian American musician and multi-media artist Ariana Delawari, finding her greatest talents came naturally.  
 
After graduating from the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, Delawari began working as an actress, musician, director and photographer.  As if that weren’t enough, she soon started work on her feature length documentary, “We Came Home,” a compilation of her family’s life story and the making of her album, “Lion of Panjshir.”  Delawari directed the album with filmmaker David Lynch, who went on to release it on his record label.  In 2012, “We Came Home” won Best International Documentary at the São Paulo International Film Festival.  But don’t think accomplishing these two milestones means Delawari’s taking a break: She recently finished her second album and will be releasing it soon.
 
Want to hear what this multimedia wonder’s produced?  Come to the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center this Friday where the multi-talented Ariana Delawari will be showcasing her original interpretations of Afghani music.
Friday, 6pm
Cost: Free
Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center 2700 F Street, NW Washington, DC
 
 
 
Love may be universal, but it may look a little different on paper.  This Saturday, the Sackler Gallery hosts the free event “In Every Language Love,” where the whole family can learn about Asian art influenced by love.  You will also have the opportunity to create your own unique Valentine using printing blocks with Asian symbols and characters.  The best Valentines are the ones that say “I love you”—regardless of the language!
Saturday, 1pm-4pm
Cost: Free
Sackler Gallery 1050 Independence Ave SW Washington, DC 20560
 
 
Join actors from major DC theatres and the award-winning band Dead Men’s Hollow for a unique musical and literary evening of Civil War songs and letters.  Dead Men’s Hollow will perform Civil War songs, both oldies and new interpretations, while actors read letters and diary entries written by nurses, civilians, and soldiers, as well as Generals Lee and Pickett.  You’ll even get to hear what a black soldier had to tell his enslaved daughter during the War.  Finish off the evening with a coffee and dessert reception following the performance.
Saturday, at 7pm
Cost: $10
The Athenaeum 201 Prince Street, Alexandria, VA 22314
 
 
Select films opening today:
 
Directed by Seth Gordon, this comedy follows the meek businessman Sandy (Jason Bateman) as he tracks down the seemingly sweet con artist (Melissa McCarthy) who’s stolen his identity.
 
 
 
In this drama directed by Steven Soderbergh, Emily (Rooney Mara) and Jonathan (Jude Law) are a New York power couple whose lives fall apart when Emily’s new prescription drug curses her with surprising side effects.
 
 

 

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WETA Celebrates Black History Month

Celebrate Black History Month with WETA, as we bring you a wide variety of unique television programs during the month February. So join us as we retrace history from musicians to civil rights figures to sports icons who helped shape culture.

 
 
MUSIC AND CULTURE
 
The “Black Dragon” 

Ron Van Clief, an African-American kungfu martial artist, starred in more than 40 kungfu films.  His discipline, technique, and resulting success earned Van Clief the nickname “Black Dragon” from Bruce Lee.  Discover Van Clief’s and other African-American men’s challenge to overcome the kungfu status quo as they mastered the ancient martial art and created a resonation in black communities across the United States.    

 
The Bravado Man 

Cab Calloway had the moves, the voice, and the charm to forge new ground for African-American jazz musicians.  Explore the life of this pioneering jazz legend who led one of the most popular African-American big bands during the jazz and swing eras of the 1930s-40s.  Best known for his signature song “Minnie the Moocher” and for his role in The Blues Brothers (1980), countless performers and audiences look up to Calloway’s talent and showmanship.   

 
 
An Indelible Mark 

Entrepreneur, songwriter, record and movie producer and director: Berry Gordy.  Gordy has left a permanent mark on music and films in the U.S. and beyond.  Gordy is the founder of Motown Records, the most successful African-American-owned enterprise in the nation.  Join WETA’s Gwen Ifill as she interviews the widely celebrated Gordy.     

 
 
Miss Maestro 

Sister Rosetta Tharpe (1915-1973) is considered the “godmother” of rock ’n’ roll.  During the 1940s-60s, Sister Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into rock ’n’ roll’s secular world.  A flamboyant superstar and electric guitarist, Sister Tharpe was a major influence on musicians such as Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Elvis Presley, and Johnny Cash.  Rock out with Sister Tharpe as American Masters explores the life, music, and influence of this African-American gospel singer and guitar virtuoso.     
 
Charged for Change 
Between 1967 and 1975, America’s black communities experienced an era of convulsive change.  Through candid 16mm footage and contemporary audio interviews with leading African-American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, experience a cinematic and musical journey exploring the people, society, culture and style that led to the black communities’ transformation during this fiery time period.      
 
The One and Only… 
Join Gwen Ifill and Smokey Robinson himself for an insider’s look at the life and career of this Motown legend.  Taped in 2009 before a theater audience at Northwestern University’s Thorne Auditorium, this program features former Motown executive and film producer Suzanna de Passe as mistress of ceremonies and musical tributes from Grammy-nominated artists such as Teena Marie, Howard Hewett, and Musiq Soulchild.  
 
A New American Sound 
Before Otis Redding, before Motown, before Aretha Franklin became the Queen of Soul, Sam Cooke put the spirit of the black church into popular music.  The first African-American artist to reach #1 on both the pop charts and R&B, Cooke forever altered popular music’s course and race relations in America.  American Masters explores Cooke’s life and music and how he came about to creating a new American sound.   
 
Unique Perspective
In Latin America and the Caribbean, millions of people of African descent have had an extensive impact on the countries’ history and culture; however, their contributions have been largely unknown.  In this 4-part series, join Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. as he unravels the African influence on society in six Latin American countries.
Part 1 of 4  Haiti & the Dominican Republic: An Island Divided 
Saturday, February 9 at 3:30am
Explore how race has been socially constructed in the Dominican Republic, a society whose people reflect centuries of intermarriage.  Then, learn about the birth of the first-ever black republic, Haiti, and how the slaves’ hard-fought liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte’s French Empire became a double-edged sword.      
Part 2 of 4  Cuba: The Next Revolution
Sunday, February 10 at 4:30pm
Discover how Cuba’s culture, religion, politics, and music are inextricably linked to the massive amount of slave labor imported to produce the country’s enormously profitable 19th-century sugar industry.  Also, examine how race and racism have fared since Fidel Castro’s Communist revolution in 1959.  
Part 3 of 4  Brazil: A Racial Paradise?
Sunday, February 17 at 4:00pm
Unmask the façade of Carnival to discover how this “rainbow nation” is waking up to its legacy as the world’s largest slave economy.  
Part 4 of 4  Mexico & Peru: The Black Grandma in the Closest 
Sunday, February 24 at 4:00pm
Investigate the history of Mexico’s and Peru’s black population-the two countries that received far more slaves than did the U.S.-and discover the worlds of culture that the slaves’ descendants have created.    
 
 
CIVIL RIGHTS
 
Unafraid to Speak 
Daisy Bates, an African-American feminist, surpassed the odds during a time of extreme turbulence and conflict.  In 1957, Bates expressed her public support for nine black students to attend the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.  Join Independent Lens as they tell Bates’ story of her bold steps that simultaneously sparked fame and hate.  
 
Like a Soldier
From May until November 1961, more than 400 black and white Americans risked their lives to travel together on buses and trains through the Deep South in a challenge to segregation.  Purposely violating the Jim Crow laws, these brave men and women became known as the “Freedom Riders” as they endured savage beatings, imprisonment, and bitter racism that tested their belief in nonviolent activism.  
 
 
A Common Misconception 
Explore an entirely new history in Slavery by Another Name, a 2012 Sundance Film Festival selection based on the Wall Street Journal’s senior writer Douglas A. Blackmon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book.  This documentary confronts one of Americans’ most relished assumptions that the Emancipation Proclamation ended slavery; instead, the post-Emancipation-era labor practices and laws pulled thousands of African Americans in both the North and South back into forced labor with shocking force and brutality.  Hear the voices of the forgotten victims, executers of forced labor, and the descendants living today in this riveting documentary.  
 
 
Turbulent Forces 
Seething and tumultuous powers in American society instigated one of the most tragic encounters in American history.  Discover the wildly disparate, yet fatefully entwined stories of an assassin, James Earl Ray, and his target, Dr. Martin Luther King JR., and their violent, tragic collision in Memphis Tennessee, on April 4, 1968.  
 
Determined for Liberty
The 19th-century clandestine Underground Railroad was run by extraordinary people who helped fugitive slaves escape forced labor.  William Still was one of the many heroic individuals that put his life at risk for the freedom of another’s.  A free black man residing in Philadelphia, William Still accepted delivery of transported crates containing “human cargo.”  Journey into the stories behind this humanitarian enterprise and explore key Canadian connections, including the surprising fate of former slaves who crossed the border to “Freedom’s Land.”  
 
The Inside Man 
Whitney M. Young, Jr. is one of the least known yet most influential black civil rights leaders.  Following his journey from segregated Kentucky to head of the National Urban League, Young fought for civil rights from within.  Young took the fight directly to the most powerful white elites ranging from Wall Street, to Fortune 500 companies, to presidents Kennedy, Nixon, and Johnson.  Follow Young’s unique story and perspective on the most pivotal events of the civil rights era, such as the March on Washington and Brown v. Board of Education, in The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights.
 
 

 

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