Peter Capaldi Will Leave 'Doctor Who' After Season 10

Peter Capaldi as the Twelfth Doctor (Photo: BBC)

It's official: Twelfth Doctor Peter Capaldi's next season of Doctor Who will be his last. 

Capaldi announced his decision to leave the show during a recent interview with BBC Radio 2 presenter Jo Whiley. Rumors have swirled for months that Capaldi might be ready to leave the iconic British sci-fi series, but up until this week he'd repeatedly told reporters and/or anyone who asked that he hadn't made his mind up yet. The series' tenth season is slated to begin April 15th, though Capaldi is currently slated to continue on in the role through the 2017 Christmas special. 

'Victoria' Season 1: 'The Clockwork Prince' Recap

Queen Victoria and Lord Melbourne in less angsty times. (Photo: Courtesy of ITV Plc)

Previously on Victoria: The queen’s Uncle Leopold, the King of Belgium, comes to visit. He and Victoria’s mother immediately start campaigning for Victoria to get married. As for the queen, she’s not terribly interested in any of her current suitors, largely because she’s pretty much head over heels for Lord Melbourne. But, when she confesses her feelings for him, he does the noble thing and rejects her, putting his duty to England first. Though Lord M later backhandedly confirms that he shares Victoria’s romantic attachment, the young queen remains convinced that she will never be happy. But King Leopold has surreptitiously invited his nephew Albert to come to England for a visit, against the queen’s wishes. 

This week, we finally meet Prince Albert. But the show may have waited just a bit too long to introduce the famous love of Victoria’s life. Not only have we all already developed crushes on Lord Melbourne (and the swoon-worthy Rufus Sewell) in the meantime, but his initial arrival kind of said “rude jerk” more than “perfect prince”. 

Will Albert acquit himself a little better this week? 

Remembering Sir John Hurt

Many of you have probably already heard the sad news of the passing of actor John Hurt. He died Friday at the age of 77. He had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in June 2015, but announced four months later that the disease was in remission after undergoing treatment. The cause of death has not yet been announced.

Mr. Hurt is survived by his wife, Anwen Rees-Myers, and his two sons, Alexander and Nicholas Hurt, from a previous marriage.

In a career that spanned six decades, Sir John received two Oscar nominations, a Golden Globe for best actor in a supporting role in Midnight Express and three BAFTA awards for various TV and film roles. The British Academy of Film and Television Arts presented Hurt with lifetime achievement award in 2012 for his outstanding contribution to British cinema. He was knighted in 2015 for his services to drama and was reportedly working up to the time of his death.

Girl Power, Rooks and ‘Victoria’ the Novel: Our Chat with Series Creator Daisy Goodwin

Jenna Coleman and Rufus Sewell in "Victoria" (Photo:  Courtesy of ITV Plc/MASTERPIECE)

Period drama Victoria ‘s first season is currently airing on PBS’ Masterpiece and it’s pretty much exactly the kind of thing your Sunday night needs. The show has been extremely successful already - it was UK network ITV’s most popular drama last year, and has already been renewed for a second season, with an additional 2017 Christmas special on the way.

Long live the queen, indeed.

Just after the season premiere here in the U.S., we had a chance for a quick chat with series’ creator Daisy Goodwin. Before helming Victoria - and writing all eight hours of its first season – Goodwin studied history at Cambridge University, with a focus on Queen Victoria. She’s also a rather accomplished author and has published several novels, including My Last Duchess, The Fortune Hunter and The American Heiress.

We got the chance to speak with Ms. Goodwin for a few minutes on a variety of topics ranging from Victoria’s feminist leanings to the historical accuracy of the show’s portrayal of Lord Melbourne to her latest book, the novel Victoria that stands alongside the series’ first season.

Read on for a transcript of our conversation, and a few fun insights about the show and the queen it is based on. 

'Victoria' Season 1: 'Brocket Hall' Recap

Victoria's very fateful piano recital (Photo: Courtesy of ITV Plc)

Previously on Victoria: Alexandrina Victoria becomes Queen of England at the age of eighteen. As the young monarch struggles to find her feet, we meet her manipulative family (terrible), Lord Melbourne (dreamy), her Prime Minister, and a (pointless) cast of servants who live downstairs. Victoria and “Lord M” immediately become inseparable, forming a close friendship and developing something of a (historically inaccurate) crush on each other, which causes some scandalous gossip.  The young queen also ends up involved in several embarrassing public incidents, including refusing to form a government unless her particular choice can lead it, and accusing one of her mother’s ladies in waiting of an affair. By the end of the day, though, Victoria has established herself, grown up a little bit, and reinstalled Lord M as Prime Minister.

Where do we go from here? Let’s find out this week. 

'Victoria' Season 1: 'Doll 123' Recap

Long live the queen! (Photo: Courtesy of ITV Plc)

After several months of anticipation and hype, as well as a bunch of trailers made up almost solely of gorgeous costumes, Victoria has arrived in the U.S. The period drama was wildly successful across the pond, and ranks as U.K. network ITV’s most successful show of the year. So to say that there are high expectations for its performance here in America is…something of an understatement.

Happily, if the first episode is anything to go by, it’s probably going to do quite well here, because it’s loads of fun. So let’s talk about it. 

'Sherlock' Season 4: 'The Final Problem' Recap

Benedict Cumberbatch is all brooding in this shot. (Photo:  Courtesy of Laurence Cendrowicz/Hartswood Films & MASTERPIECE)

Previously on Sherlock: Sherlock went on a massive drug bender and staged an elaborate case to catch a serial killer, all so that he could give John someone to rescue and somehow help him process his grief over his wife’s death. It turns out that Sherlock and Mycroft have a heretofore unseen secret sibling who, surprise, is actually a sister, not the brother everyone thought . Her name is Eurus and she’s a little bit…well, crazy is probably the best word. She staged an elaborate ruse, involving multiple disguises and fake identities to both pose as John’s therapist and also as the woman who managed to get him to engage in an emotional affair. Why? No idea. Oh, and she also pulled out a gun and shot him at the end of last week’s episode.

Man, a lot of weird stuff happened this season. If you need a recap of last week, you can catch up on "The Lying Detective" here

“The Final Problem” is, like much of Season 4, a mixed bag. There are several intriguing smaller riddles, along with a few plot threads that make absolutely no sense. (And one rather large plot thread that makes no sense either.) The insertion of Eurus in this story still feels strange, and at times too new to hang the crux of the season on. And, for better or worse, the show officially seems to have crossed the line into pure soap opera territory. There are a few twists and character moments that would probably make Days of Our Lives’ infamous Stefano DiMera proud. 

Five Reasons You Should Watch ‘Victoria’

Long live Victoria and this iconic blue dress. (Photo: Courtesy of ITV Plc/MASTERPIECE)

Period drama Victoria finally comes to America this January, telling the story of the early years in the reign of one of England’s greatest queens. The eight-hour drama will follow Victoria from her ascension at just 18 years of age through her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert. She went on to have nine children and 42 grandchildren, as well as to rule over a rather large portion of the world. But she wasn’t always the stodgy older woman dressed all in black that we all know from history. She was once a flirtatious, impetuous young woman at the head of a court filled with scandal and drama.

In short: This is the kind of history that makes for pretty great TV. Here are some reasons that you should give it a try.

Pages