• The "stage" at Wheaton Youth Center as it looks today. (Photo: Jeff Krulik)
    Myth or Mishap?
     
     
    Led Zeppelin Played Here
    Did Led Zeppelin really make its Washington-area debut in front of 50 confused teens at the Wheaton Youth Center on Jan. 20, 1969?
  • It Happened Here
     
     
    In 1916, renowned pacifist Jeannette Rankin made history as the first woman elected to Congress. At age 87, Rankin made one final push for peace by leading an anti-Vietnam march: the Jeannette Rankin Brigade.
  • The Robert Portner Brewing Company's main brewery at St. Asaph & Pendelton Streets in Alexandria. Known as the "Tivoli" Brewery, it operated from 1869 until 1916. Photo courtesy of the Portner Brewhouse.
    Robert Portner Brewing Company
     
     
    From the closing years of the Civil War until prohibition, the Robert Portner Brewing Company of Alexandria, Virginia was the leading brewery and distributor in the southeastern United States.
  • Ice skating on the Reflecting Pool in January 1922. (Image source: Library of Congress)
    Winter Fun
     
     
    Ice Carnival at the Tidal Basin
    In January 1912, 15,000 people showed up for an evening of costumed skating on the Tidal Basin.
  • Edgar Allan Poe, 1849
    Mysterious Poe
     
     
    Seeking a stable government job, Edgar Allan Poe embarked on an ill-fated trip to Washington in 1843
Redskins quarterback Sammy Baugh in 1937. (Source: Library of Congress)

The Redskins Rule and the Election

Well, the Redskins may have trouble winning football games these days, but they have proven quite effective at predicting presidential elections over the years. Since the team moved to Washington in 1937 there have been 18 presidential elections. In 17 of those, the so-called "Redskins Rule" has held up:

If the Redskins win their last home game before the election, the incumbent's party will win the election and keep the White House. If the Redskins lose, the challenging party's candidate will win the election.

So, what does this mean about this year's election?

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

I came across this photo while doing some research about the National Zoo. It's a picture of jazz quintet playing a concert for a polar bear in the 1920s. Errr... what? I'd really like to know what precipitated this. Did these dudes just wake up one morning and say, "Hey, let's go down to the zoo and play a set for the bears." "Good idea, I'll see if Gertrude is free to dance for them."? Well, in any case, the bear seems to be enjoying it. Or maybe he's just waiting for his chance to take a swipe at them through the bars.

See the full size photo »

Southern Maryland Dutch Country

Amish horse and buggy on the road in Southern Maryland. (Courtesy of St. Mary's College of Southern Maryland Archives.)

Amish horses and buggies in the Washington, D.C. Metro area? Yep. It's true. Over 200 Amish families live and work in St. Mary’s and Charles counties in Maryland, less than 40 miles from downtown D.C. The settlement, which is centered around the town of Charlotte Hall, dates to 1939 when seven families migrated to the area from Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania for the cheap Maryland land(!) and to escape pressure from the Pennsylvania state government.

The Legend of the Bunny Man

Bunny Man Bridge in Clifton, Virginia has haunted local teens for decades. (Photo source: Flickr user Motoboy92)

You’re sixteen years old, caught up in the intoxicating freedom that comes with your new driver’s license, and it’s Halloween night. You and your friends are driving around your small town looking for a quiet place far away from adult supervision. You decide to park on the side of the road near a secluded railway overpass. It’s the perfect place to get “up to something,” as your mother would say: woods creeping up on either side and the complete darkness you can only find on rural roads without streetlamps or nearby houses.

Pages