• Resurrection City spent six muddy weeks on the National Mall, within view of landmarks such as the Capitol. (Photo source: Wikipedia Commons)
    MLK's Final Dream
     
     
    In 1968, just weeks after Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, impoverished Americans flocked to Washington to live out his final dream: economic equality for all.
  • In the early morning hours of May 9, 1970 President Nixon drove to the Lincoln Memorial and mingled with a group of anti-war demonstrators. Here, Nixon chats with Barbara Hirsch, 24, of Cleveland, Ohio (left) and Lauree Moss, of Detroit, Mich. (Photo: © Bettmann/CORBIS)
    Strange But True
     
     
    Just days after the Kent State tragedy, President Nixon made a bizarre pre-dawn visit to the Lincoln Memorial to talk with anti-war protesters.
  • Portrait of Lead Belly, National Press Club, Washington, D.C., between 1938 and 1948 (Photo: William P. Gottlieb, Library of Congress)
    Impressions of Washington
     
     
    Lead Belly's "Bourgeois Blues," written about his first visit to Washington in 1937, was an incisive indictment of the city’s racial segregation.
  • A group of men are led by police out of a building in handcuffs
    Holy Warriors
     
     
    The story of the D.C. 9: the Catholics who became convicts in order to stop the war in Vietnam
  • Julius Hobson: Getting Out of the Rat Race
    Julius Hobson
     
     
    In 1964, when D.C. wouldn't do anything about the rat problem in Shaw, Julius Hobson gave them an ultimatum: fix the problem, or have it in Georgetown.
  • Student protesters face down riot police on Route 1, University of Maryland, 1970 (Photo source: University of Maryland Special Collections)
    It Happened Here
     
     
    When President Nixon announced the U.S. invasion of Cambodia in the spring of 1970, the College Park erupted in the "biggest and most violent" protest in University of Maryland history.
Buttons like this could be seen around D.C. in 1964 as District residents voted in their first Presidential election. (Source: ebay)

D.C.'s Electoral Vote

It’s Election Day, and hopefully most of you are braving the cold and the lines at your local polling place to make sure your voice is heard. If you cast your ballot for a presidential candidate in the District, you exercised a right that has only been around for 52 years; that’s how long DC residents have had the right to vote in presidential elections, a right granted by the 23rd Amendment.

Redskins quarterback Sammy Baugh in 1937. (Source: Library of Congress)

The Redskins Rule and the Election

Well, the Redskins may have trouble winning football games these days, but they have proven quite effective at predicting presidential elections over the years. Since the team moved to Washington in 1937 there have been 18 presidential elections. In 17 of those, the so-called "Redskins Rule" has held up:

If the Redskins win their last home game before the election, the incumbent's party will win the election and keep the White House. If the Redskins lose, the challenging party's candidate will win the election.

So, what does this mean about this year's election?

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

A Friday Photo: Jazz for the Bears

I came across this photo while doing some research about the National Zoo. It's a picture of jazz quintet playing a concert for a polar bear in the 1920s. Errr... what? I'd really like to know what precipitated this. Did these dudes just wake up one morning and say, "Hey, let's go down to the zoo and play a set for the bears." "Good idea, I'll see if Gertrude is free to dance for them."? Well, in any case, the bear seems to be enjoying it. Or maybe he's just waiting for his chance to take a swipe at them through the bars.

See the full size photo »

Southern Maryland Dutch Country

Amish horse and buggy on the road in Southern Maryland. (Courtesy of St. Mary's College of Southern Maryland Archives.)

Amish horses and buggies in the Washington, D.C. Metro area? Yep. It's true. Over 200 Amish families live and work in St. Mary’s and Charles counties in Maryland, less than 40 miles from downtown D.C. The settlement, which is centered around the town of Charlotte Hall, dates to 1939 when seven families migrated to the area from Bird-in-Hand, Pennsylvania for the cheap Maryland land(!) and to escape pressure from the Pennsylvania state government.

The Legend of the Bunny Man

Bunny Man Bridge in Clifton, Virginia has haunted local teens for decades. (Photo source: Flickr user Motoboy92)

You’re sixteen years old, caught up in the intoxicating freedom that comes with your new driver’s license, and it’s Halloween night. You and your friends are driving around your small town looking for a quiet place far away from adult supervision. You decide to park on the side of the road near a secluded railway overpass. It’s the perfect place to get “up to something,” as your mother would say: woods creeping up on either side and the complete darkness you can only find on rural roads without streetlamps or nearby houses.

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