John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

A young and serious Willis Conover, cigarette in one hand, jazz record in the other, in his Voice of America studio. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Willis Conover Questions

While visiting Moscow, a group of American tourists had encountered a flurry of questions from curious Russians, “what was the price of an American automobile, what did Americans think of ‘beat generation’ writers, how many Americans were unemployed?” When the interrogation broached the subject of music, one American boasted familiarity with Shostakovich, Khachaturian, and Prokofiev. “And,” one Russian chimed in, “is Willis Conover highly regarded in the United States?” Russian eyes widened, American brows furrowed, and a puzzled silence ensued.

Creating a National Culture Center

AR7606-H. President John F. Kennedy Speaks at Fundraising Event for the National Cultural Center, November 29, 1962 (Photo Source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum) AR7606-H, Abbie Rowe. White House Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston

At 7 p.m. on November 29th , 1962, 5,000 Washingtonians dressed in black ties and furs arrived at the D.C. National Guard Armory for a $100-a-plate dinner, and fundraising show titled An American Pageant of the Arts. President and Mrs. Kennedy started the event by addressing the crowd about the importance of the arts in fostering American culture and a healthy democracy. Afterwards, the master of ceremonies, Leonard Bernstein, took over and the 2 hour and 43 minute show, featuring some of the greatest performers in music, literature, and comedy, began. The variety show kicked off a $30 million fundraising initiative to raise money for the construction of a National Cultural Center on the bank of the Potomac.

The Great Folklife Festival Bull Chase of 1976

Two cowboys pictured on the right roping a bull calf that is resisting capture on the left.

On August 4, 1976 cowboys from the American Southwest section of the Smithsonian’s annual Festival of American Folklife were in the middle of demonstrating a calf roping technique when a 400-pound bull calf "made him a hole" in the corral fence and took-off from the Festival site into lunch-hour traffic.