Sue Eisenfeld

Shenandoah: A Story of Conservation and Betrayal


"You don’t have to look too far when you’re in Shenandoah to see the relics of human habitation. You don’t have to be a historian. You don’t have to be an archaeologist. You can stay on trail. You can’t help but find stone walls that were built by somebody, clearly. There’s old roads. There’s house foundations. These are things you can see from the trail. So, I just saw these things over many, many years and I kind of wondered for awhile what they were all about but I didn’t really look into it for quite some time, until I started going a little bit off trail and finding more things off trail. And my curiosity was really piqued and I wanted to know, who were these people? Why are they not here? Why did they leave? Where did they go? And, what is their story all about?"

That's what author Sue Eisenfeld told me when I asked her about the origin of her book, Shenandoah: A Story of Conservation and Betrayal. On Thursday, February 12 at 7pm, Eisenfeld will be giving a talk on the subject at the Marymount University library (2807 N. Glebe Rd, Arlington, VA 22207) for the Arlington Historical Society. In advance of the program, we sat down with her to learn more about the story. Check out the video above and read more after the jump!