Agatha Sloboda

Growing up all around the world, Agatha confidently claims D.C. to be the favorite of her many hometowns. After attending high schools in Nairobi and Istanbul, she completed a degree in Growth and Structure of Cities at Bryn Mawr College, just outside Philadelphia. Agatha never quite intended to take an interest in history, local or otherwise, until a summer tour-guiding job awakened an enthusiasm for story-telling, resulting in a senior thesis on the Washington Monument. When she isn't ruminating on ways in which urban objects inform the nuances of human experience, you may find her performing in the local music scene.

Posts by Agatha Sloboda

A young and serious Willis Conover, cigarette in one hand, jazz record in the other, in his Voice of America studio. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Willis Conover Questions

While visiting Moscow, a group of American tourists had encountered a flurry of questions from curious Russians, “what was the price of an American automobile, what did Americans think of ‘beat generation’ writers, how many Americans were unemployed?” When the interrogation broached the subject of music, one American boasted familiarity with Shostakovich, Khachaturian, and Prokofiev. “And,” one Russian chimed in, “is Willis Conover highly regarded in the United States?” Russian eyes widened, American brows furrowed, and a puzzled silence ensued.

Exterior view of Pope-Leighey House in the early evening, as warm light shines through the uniquely carved clerestory windows

All's Wright that Ends Well: The Pope-Leighey House of Northern Virginia

When Loren Pope learned of the acclaimed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, he spent months working up the courage to mail him a letter. "There are certain things a man wants during life, and, of life," Pope divulged in 1941. "Material things and things of the spirit. The writer has one fervent wish that includes both. It is for a house created by you." Wright penned in response, "Of course I'm ready to give you a house." Their earnest collaboration resulted in a humbly exquisite Falls Church home. Pope's wish had come true, but mere wishful thinking would not be enough to save the house from highway builders in the 1960s.

Map of proposed Three Sisters Bridge to connect Virginia and Washington D.C. via I-266

No Bridge for Three Sisters

As a centuries-old legend has it, three young women attempted to cross the Potomac River late one night. They drowned in a horrific storm, however, and marked the place of their deaths with a cluster of rocks: the Three Sisters Islands. Today's kayakers and canoe paddlers may not feel the dread of the three sisters' curse, but their final promise may explain D.C.'s failure to build a bridge over these islands. If we cannot cross the river here, then nobody else ever will. The unbuilt Three Sisters Bridge played a crucial role in mid-20th century politics, especially the subway vs. freeway debates that would determine the future of transit in the nation's capital.