Valeria Almada

Valeria Almada has lived in the DC area her entire life, with brief international stints in Ireland, England, and Argentina. While abroad, she began to develop an interest in local history, sharing her discoveries through blog posts and travel magazine articles. After returning to America, she continued this newfound interest by exploring and documenting the history of her own hometown. Valeria graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s degree in English at George Mason University and boasts a healthy obsession for reading and writing stories, both real and fictional.

Posts by Valeria Almada

President Theodore Roosevelt's daughter, Alice, was married at the White House just after Valentine's Day in 1906 and gave birth to a daughter on Valentine's Day in 1925. The family's coincidental and sometimes complicated relationship with the holiday did not stop there. (Photo source: Wikipedia)

Valentine's Day: Love, Life and Death for the Roosevelts

Valentine’s Days were unusually eventful for Theodore Roosevelt and family, as this date marked some of the happiest and darkest periods in their lives. On February 14th of 1880, the 21-year-old future president publicly announced his engagement to Alice Hathaway Lee. The two previous years of dating sparked a short but intensely happy bond. Teddy and Alice were married the next October and, four years later, welcomed their first child.

On Valentine’s Day of 1884, Teddy was getting used to first-time parenthood. Baby Alice (named after her mother) was born just two days earlier, while he was away and he was eager to return home to spend time with his growing family. But what should have been a joyous time quickly turned tragic.

Civil War Healing at Arlington National Cemetery

WETA Television's new documentary, Arlington National Cemetery (which premieres tomorrow night!) has inspired us to do some digging on cemetery history. Here's the background behind one of Arlington's most meaningful memorials.

On a warm, sunny day in June of 1914, a crowd gathered to witness the unveiling of what The Washington Post described as “a memorial of heroic size, commemorating war, but dedicated to peace.” It was an intricately designed, 32-foot tall granite monument deeply embedded with symbolic meaning for visitors to decode. A large statue of a woman facing southward dominated the top of the monument. In her extended arm was a laurel wreath meant to represent the sacrifices of fallen soldiers. Below her, a Biblical passage was inscribed, near four urns that symbolize the four years of the Civil War, and fourteen shields. Closer to the monument’s base are thirty-two life-sized figures, including Southerners of varying military branch, race, gender, occupation, and age, along with mythological characters such as Minerva, Goddess of War.[1]

So what was this new monument and why were so many people clamoring to see it?