BAFTAs

Watch TV Like a Brit: BAFTA Winners You Can Stream

On Sunday evening the UK television industry honored their own at the Virgin TV British Academy Television Awards. Broadcast on BBC One, the BAFTA ceremony was held at the Royal Festival Hall in London and was hosted by former Great British Bake Off  (or Great British Baking Show to us Americans) presenter Sue Perkins. The complete list of winners, featuring access to all the acceptance speeches, can be found here

Considering American viewers may not be familiar with many of these programs, it seemed more appropriate to highlight those we can access rather than post the entire list of winners. Fortunately, with the creation of new streaming platforms and a proliferation of American partnerships with UK broadcasters, availability of British content in the US continues to grow every year. And I for one couldn’t be more pleased.

And now on to the winners…

BAFTA 2015: Which is the Best British Film?

If the holidays are wrapping up and the cold, dark winter is truly setting in, it can mean only one thing. It’s awards season! For the UK film industry, the greatest accolade that can be bestowed is from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, BAFTA for short, which also happens to the name of the statuette presented to the winners.

On this past Friday, the nominees for the 2015 BAFTAs were announced at the Picadilly headquarters of the Academy itself by perennial host Stephen Fry and his cohort Sam Claflin. While there might have been a few snubs, most of the expected names were announced. Of interest to British movie fans, The Theory of Everything and The Imitation Game received multiple nods for acting, screenplay, director and best overall film. Ralph Fiennes, Rosamund Pike and Imelda Staunton also earned nominations for their impressive work in The Grand Budapest Hotel, Gone Girl and Pride respectively. A complete list of nominees can be found here.

Though a British organization, most of BAFTA’s awards are not limited to UK produced movies except for one – the Outstanding British Film category. Last year some of the nominees for this award had a tenuous claim to this distinction. In fact it was Gravity starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney that won this honor in 2014.

This year’s batch of outstanding movies are much more identifiably British and a good representation of UK filmmaking overall. Two are biopics of famous scholars, two are based on historical events set in the fairly recent past, one is a Scottish sci-fi thriller and the last is a CGI depiction of a beloved British children’s character. I’ve actually seen four out of the six films on the list and, despite a few disagreements based on my own personal tastes, would concur with a majority of its candidates.

Let’s take a look at the nominees, shall we?

Some Highlights from the BAFTA 2014 Film Awards

With two weeks to go until the Oscars are presented, the British Academy Film Awards had their say this past weekend at London’s Royal Opera House with resident host Stephen Fry presiding. While you can check out the entire list of winners here, it would be a bit dull to go through each and every award and appearance of note. Therefore I have condensed the event into a few of my favorite moments.

Read on for more.

Meet the 2014 BAFTA Nominees for the British Film of the Year – What Makes These Films Qualify?

Award season 2014 is in full swing and new nominations seem to be announced nearly every day. So far we’ve heard pronouncements from the Golden Globes, SAG awards, Critics Choice, and Independent Spirit…all leading to the Holy Grail of statuettes, the Oscar.

BAFTA, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, has also announced its film nominations for the year just gone by and it’s a very international hodgepodge indeed. While Hollywood is still the Mecca of all things show business, the multi-national trend of moviemaking continues to gain momentum. Determining the actual country of origin of any given film is an increasingly complicated task. BAFTA and the British Film Institute have their own convoluted guidelines, including a culture test, which determine a movie’s Britishness. Let’s take a closer look at the BAFTA category of Outstanding British Film of the Year to discover what it takes to qualify.

BAFTA TV Nominations 2013: The Good, the Bad, the What Were They Thinking?

Nominations for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTAs) TV Awards were announced this morning and, for the second year in a row, the list of nominees features a combination of great performances and truly bizarre omissions that makes one wonder whether the nomination process boils down to drawing names from a hat.

Leading the field this year were Olympic-themed comedy Twenty Twelve, Alfred Hitchcock biopic The Girl and drama Last Tango in Halifax, which all picked up four nominations apiece. The 2012 London Olympics also fared well, taking 3 out of 4 nominations in the “Sporting and Live Event” category, and Danny Boyle’s Isles of Wonder Opening Ceremonies will also compete for the Audience Award.

Some of these nominations are spot-on: it’s lovely to see Last Tango in Halifax getting nominated; both because of its unconventional love story and the fact that stars Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid are fantastic. Twenty Twelve was hysterical. Ben Whishaw did amazing things with a traditionally under-performed Richard II in The Hollow Crown. Boyle surely deserves every award he’s about to win for his stunning work on the Olympics. Even though I thought The Girl was boring, Toby Jones is always a capable performer.

And yet, much like 2012, there are just some really weird picks and obvious snubs. Click through for a look at the full list of nominations, and then let's discuss what they got right and what they got wrong in the comments. The awards ceremony is scheduled for May 12.

The BAFTA TV Awards: No Love for Benedict Cumberbatch or Maggie Smith as Appropriate Adult Basically Wins Everything

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) TV Awards ceremony was held yesterday to honor the best in television performances from the past year.

ITV mini-series Appropriate Adult, the dramatization of the life of serial killer Fred West, scored three of the biggest awards of the night, with Dominic West taking home Lead Actor, Emily Watson winning Lead Actress and Monica Dolan grabbing the statue for Supporting Actress.

Sherlock’s Andrew Scott took home the trophy for Supporting Actor for his performance as James Moriarty, edging out co-star Martin Freeman.

The Fades, BBC Three’s recently cancelled supernatural drama, won Best Drama Series, while Mrs. Brown’s Boys took home the Best Comedy honors.

Sherlock and Doctor Who head honcho Steven Moffat was presented with the Dennis Potter Special Award for his television writing contributions and his award was handed out by Benedict Cumberbatch and Matt Smith, in one of the only actually funny sequences of the evening. (It’s really pretty adorable, so click this link and give it a watch.)

Given the dominance of Appropriate Adult in the acting categories a couple of notable (and personal favorite) performances were passed over, including Sherlock star Cumberbatch – currently on his fourth nomination without a win – and Downton Abbey’s Dowager Countess, Dame Maggie Smith.

Sherlock also lost out in the YouTube Audience Award vote to (seriously?) Celebrity Juice. Travesty seems too weak a word in this particular instance.

For a full list of this year’s BAFTA winners, click through and take a look!

BAFTA TV Nominations Announced: Is This Bizarre To Anyone Else?

Nominations for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTAs) TV Awards were announced this morning and, quite frankly, the list features some truly bizarre omissions that slightly mar what was, otherwise, a stunningly good year for British TV.

Leading the field with four nominations is Appropriate Adult, the ITV mini-series based on the life of serial killer Fred West, starring Dominic West and Emily Watson. The drama received nods in the Best Mini-Series, Leading Actor (West), Leading Actress (Watson) and Supporting Actress (the fabulous Monica Dolan) categories.

The second series of Sherlock was close behind, with three nominations – Benedict Cumberbatch will compete in the Leading Actor category, while Martin Freeman and Andrew Scott face off against each other in the Supporting Actor arena. This is England '88 also received three nods - tying Sherlock for the second most nominations this year.

But, perhaps the biggest surprises of the morning are the nominations that didn’t happen. Sherlock, the winner of last year’s Best Drama Series prize, snagged multiple acting nods this time out, but is conspicuously absent from the Best Mini-Series competition, in a move that seems, well, crazy. This likely had something to do with the ridiculous internal reorganization the BAFTAs underwent this year, creating Golden Globes-esque separate categories for Best “Mini-Series” (2-5 episodes) and Best “Series” (6-19 episodes). Yet, whatever the reason, the omission is jarring, given the overall superb quality of Sherlock’s second series.

In other surprise non-nominations, international smash Downton Abbey received exactly one nod for its second series, for Dame Maggie Smith in the Supporting Actress category. While I’m as willing as anyone to admit that perhaps Downton’s sophomore effort did not quite live up to the brilliance of its first series, even sub-par Downton is as entertaining and generally moving as anything on television and, judging by the chatter online, has to have been better than the final series of Spooks/MI-5.

Click through for a look at the full list of nominations, and leave us your thoughts on all this in the comments. The awards ceremony is scheduled for May 27.