Colin Firth

British Actors Excel at Playing Real People: They’ve Got the Oscars to Prove It

British actors aren’t strangers to Academy Award acclaim. Last weekend Eddie Redmayne, star of The Theory of Everything in which he gave a radiant performance as world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, joined the company of almost thirty of his fellow countrymen and women in winning a Best Leading Actor or Actress statuette since the honors were first bestowed 87 years ago.

Vivien Leigh won twice for her portrayal of some very famous fictional characters; in 1940 for Gone with the Wind and in 1952 for A Streetcar Named Desire. Laurence Olivier was recognized in 1949 for his interpretation of one of the most famous of Shakespeare’s characters, Hamlet.

Today, however, I want to focus on those actors, like Mr. Redmayne who have taken on the daunting challenge of playing a person who actually existed and were rewarded with a little bald golden man for their trouble. The biopic trend has been on the increase since the 1980’s but that’s not to say that people weren’t bringing history to life long before that time.

The Paddington Bear Movie Loses Colin Firth as Its Voice Star

It would appear that Creepy Paddington has claimed his first victim.

Yes, it’s fairly obvious that the big screen version of the children’s tale Paddington Bear is basically your worst nightmare, but weren’t we all hoping that some of the horror of Paddington would be alleviated by the fact that the CGI-created rampant serial killer iconic bear was going to be voiced by Everyone’s Dream Man, Colin Firth?

Well, sorry, because Creepy Paddington doesn’t let us have nice things. According to a report in Entertainment Weekly, Firth has split with the film in the midst of production. “After a period of denial, we’ve chosen ‘conscious uncoupling,’” the Oscar winner told the magazine.

WATCH: Colin Firth in the Trailer for 'The Railway Man'

Who wants to watch Colin Firth probably scoop up some more statues this awards season? Who doesn’t, right?

Firth, who’s not really made a big movie since his Oscar-winning turn as King George VI in The King’s Speech, is headed back to a multiplex near you. (And, yes, I know he was in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy the year after, but that film was an ensemble of Epic British Talent, not a starring vehicle for him, and it got shamefully overlooked at Oscar time to boot. Not that I am bitter about that still or anything. Much.)

Anyway. This time, Firth is starring opposite fellow Oscar winner Nicole Kidman in a film called The Railway Man. Based on his best-selling memoir, the film tells the true story of Eric Lomax, a British Army officer who had been tormented as a prisoner of war at a Japanese labor camp during World War II. Decades later, Lomax discovers that the officer who tortured him is still alive, and sets off to confront him.

Here’s the trailer, which was just released last week.

This is a Real Thing: Giant Colin Firth Currently Hanging Out in Hyde Park’s Serpentine Lake

This is one of those things that feels like it ought to be too incredible – or just flat out too weird – to be true. And yet, it actually exists, in a perfect storm of awesomeness with just a dash of crazy mixed in. In short: There’s a giant sculpture of Colin Firth coming out of Hyde Park’s Serpentine Lake in London, basically like Godzilla, except considerably more attractive.

The twelve foot sculpture has been created to mark the launch of new UKTV channel Drama and recreates the famous scene from the 1995 BBC adaptation in which Firth’s Mr. Darcy emerges from a lake, clad in a white shirt and breeches, to meet Elizabeth Bennett and made women across the globe swoon. It was voted the most memorable moment in British TV drama, hence the creation of the sculpture, which is the height of a double decker bus. Click through for more details.