DC

The Hurricane That Created the Ocean City We Know Today

 

When readers of the Washington Evening Star opened their papers on August 25, 1933 they needed no reminder of what had just befallen the city. Two days earlier, the fiercest storm the nation’s capital had seen in decades pushed a wall of water up the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River. In a matter of hours, over six inches of rain fell on D.C. 51-mph winds toppled trees. Floodwaters submerged highways. Roofs were torn off buildings. A train crossing the Anacostia River was swept off its tracks. The list went on… Damage was even worse in Ocean City, yet the storm was also a cause for celebration. Huh?

Chuting Books to the Congressional Library

“Washington D.C., Library of Congress 1897-1910.” (Photo Source: Library of Congress) Detroit Publishing Co., Copyright Claimant, and Publisher Detroit Publishing Co. Washington, D.C., Library of Congress. District of Columbia United States, Washington D.C, None. [Between 1897 and 1910] Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/

By 1875, the old Congressional Library had completely exhausted its shelf space, and the Library's new building was not completed until February 1897. Although the 20 year wait for the physical structure was a long one, it seemed that the months between the building’s completion in February 1897 and its opening day on November 1, 1897 were the longest of all. Throughout these nine months, librarians and engineers joined together to try and solve one major problem: how would they move all of the Library’s contents the quarter of a mile distance from the Capitol to the new library without “loss, damage, and confusion.” The answer? Book chutes.

The Goodman League: Comedy, Cookout, Church, and Basketball

Capital Punishment - Goodman League vs. Drew League (Source: GAMEFACE-PHOTOS on flickr. Used via Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic License.)

In the summer of 2011, basketball fans across the country weren't sure when they would ever get to see their favorite NBA players in action again due to labor strife. Luckily for those right here in the District, a community streetball league based in Southeast offered up the perfect solution to get some of the game's top talent on the court and competing again, and managed to turn a small gym in Northeast, D.C. into the center of the basketball universe for one special night.

"Laddie Boy" immediately catapulted to stardom as he captured hearts of local and national admirers alike. (Photo credit: Harris & Ewing Photography Collection, Library of Congress)

A Dog’s Life for Laddie Boy

It used to be that presidential pets were considered nothing special, but after World War I, Washingtonians were looking for happy news -- and they got it in the form of a happy-go-lucky dog that changed how Americans looked at animals who lived in the White House.

Poster commemorating the life of Chuck Brown (Source: DC Library's Go-Go Archive)

Call to all D.C. Go-Go Fans: Let’s Keep the Memory of D.C.’s Homegrown Sound Go-Going

Go-go music is a signature Washington, D.C. sound and the D.C. Public Library has started an archive to preserve its history. Archivist Derek Gray is leading the charge and is seeking heirlooms related to the D.C. go-go scene: CDs and audio recordings of Chuck Brown and other go-go artists, flyers, posters, event advertisements, photographs, videos, DVDs, and other memorabilia. Help preserve the legacy of D.C.’s homegrown sound for future generations!

Traditional Ethiopian injera dish (Source: Wikipedia. Photo by Richard from kansas city, united states - grab it and then eat it, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2336325)

Claiming a Neighborhood: Shaw and Little Ethiopia

In 2005, Ethiopian restaurateurs led a campaign to rename a strip of Ninth Street between U and T Little Ethiopia, to reflect the contributions that Ethiopians made to the Shaw neighborhood over the previous decade.  These business leaders faced backlash, however, from Shaw’s African-American community who thought the renaming campaign discounted the neighborhood’s proud African-American history.

Carrying a Torch for the Olympics

Embed from Getty Images

One of the most memorable neighborhood block parties in recent memory kicked into gear as the Olympic flame came to Washington in the summer of 1996.  From Rockville to Reston, area residents got into the Olympic spirit as they welcomed the unusual guest.

Rare Essence Go-Goes On

Rare Essence Logo (Source: DC Library's Go-Go Archive)

“There ain’t no party like an R.E. party, cause an R.E. party don’t stop.” Rare Essence, known around the DMV as “the most wickedest band alive,” has been one of the region’s most popular go-go acts for over 40  years despite several setbacks which could have easily ended the party.  

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